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Preamp,phono, stage, plinth,Buying a Thorens, TD 160, restoration,Thorens, turntable, vintage, vinyl, TD 145, motor, Dustcover, dust, cover, tone, arm, tonearm

Thorens TD 160 Motor

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Preamp,phono, stage, plinth, TD 160, restoration,Thorens, turntable, vintage, vinyl, motor
Preamp,phono, stage, plinth, TD 160, restoration,Thorens, turntable, vintage, vinyl,Buying,

What Oil For The Thorens TD 160 Motor?

Of the more available oils recommended for the Thorens TD 160 motor, Singer Sowing machine oil. is the most often mentioned.  I’m not sure oiling the Thorens TD 160 motor will do any good.  I do fear that oiling it might cause an accumulation of dirt particles to gum up with the oil.  Most of the motors I’ve opened were never oiled. That might be because the oil never actually got in.  Getting the oil to the parts that need it most is difficult.  In any event the oil will not stay there for very long.  The motors were not oiled in the factory because they are self-lubricating, sintered / oilite motors.

 

 

Sonceboz Oilite Motor

I understand from, Menahem Yachad, of Concourse,  that the Thorens TD 160 motor was manufactured by the Swiss company Sonceboz.   Berger Lahr   also manufactuered for Thorens but that, I understand, is later.

The motor has a self-lubricating oilite bearings – bronze infused with lubricant.  Olite motors were a radical invention by Chrysler in 1930.  By 1933, they had taken the world by storm,  selling 18 million in that year alone.  When Thorens implemented the motor oilite was less than forty years in existence.  Now fifty years on from that we know more about their durability than could ever have been known in the 1960s.   Most TD 160 motors are still perfect.   If they have been damaged or the developed a “knock” there are some very effective remedies.

Thorens TD 160 Motor “Knock”

Some motors do develop a “knock” or at least that is what it is called.  This doesn’t seem to be age related.   The knock has been around for decades.  In fact, there are lots of different “knocks”.   The most common one can be ameliorated by pushing the bottom axil up.  This has led to a theory that the rotor slips down on the axil and knocks against the bottom of the motor casing.  Menahem Yachad, on the other hand suggestes that it is a flaw in the assembly of the motor casing and a drying out of the oilite.

I haven’t fully investigated the various theories.  I have managed to rebuilt motors with damaged shafts and they are all still running.   I’m convinced that all of the knock problems can be solved by rebuilding the motor.

I invite anyone with specific information about these motors or viable alternative to comment below.

I believed they can be repaired for less than the price of a DC motor alternative.  I think the majority of Thorens TD 160 owners are happy with the performance of the original motor and, I trust, share my preference for retaining the extraordinary engineering of the original, most of which are still excellent performers.

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